Cutting Pills to Reduce Cost

saving money on prescriptions

Cutting pills is a common strategy to save money at the pharmacy. If it is something you’d like to to do, just be sure you are capable of cutting the tablets. Pharmacies cannot cut tablets for you.

The best way to help you determine if you can cut a pill is to explain the pill that are not recommended to be cut. Enteric coated tablets are designed to pass through the stomach and dissolve in the intestine, cutting the pill in half will cause it to dissolve in the stomach. Capsules and gel caps simply can’t be split accurately.cutting tablets

Narrow therapeutic window medications like levothyroxine and digoxin are not recommend, although some doctors will allow patients to cut them. Tablets that crumble when cut will result in a inaccurate dose. And, Irregular shaped tablets are difficult to cut.

Cutting a tablet in half does result in half the dose. There is no pill splitting list, ask your pharmacist when you pick up your medication. Use a pill splitter is typically best, although some pills break easily by hand.




Amlodipine for blood pressure  usually breaks easily. Antidepressants like sertraline also tend to break easily. Metoprolol both the tartrate and the extended release tablets can be broken. Many of the statin drugs like atorvastatin can be accurately broken.  Lisinopril for blood pressure will usually break well.

If uncertain, as you Pharmacist and Doctor. It is important you are able to get the correct dose of medication. Please always contact a health care provider before staring or stopping medication.



Are you paying the best price for your medications? Use my price checker to see if you could be saving money. If the price is better print the card or take a screen shot of it to your pharmacy and save!

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Disclaimer

The pharmaceutical information on this site is provided as an information resource only, and is not to be used or relied on for any diagnostic or treatment purposes. This information is not intended to be patient education and should not be used as a substitute for professional diagnosis and treatment.
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